colorbar

Nausea and Vomiting Can Be Common Side Effects of Chemotherapy

After you receive chemotherapy, you may experience nausea and vomiting. This is called chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, or CINV. You may experience these side effects within the first 24 hours and/or during the next several days after treatment.1
Your risk may be related to a number of factors, including:
  • The type of chemotherapy you will receive1
  • Whether you have common risk factors, such as1
    • You are a woman
    • You are under the age of 50
    • You have low alcohol consumption (less than 1 ounce a day)
    • You had nausea or vomiting with previous cancer treatments
    • You are prone to motion sickness or anxiety
    • You had morning sickness when you were pregnant
Discuss these factors with your healthcare provider. He or she will consider them when assessing your risk of nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy and determine the best treatments to help prevent it.
Learn how SUSTOL can help with CINV prevention Learn how SUSTOL can help with CINV prevention

Indication

SUSTOL is indicated in combination with other antiemetics in adults for the prevention of acute and delayed nausea and vomiting associated with initial and repeat courses of moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC) or anthracycline and cyclophosphamide (AC) combination chemotherapy regimens.

Important Safety Information

Contraindications

SUSTOL is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to granisetron, any of the components of SUSTOL, or any other 5-HT3 receptor antagonist.

Warnings and Precautions

Injection site reactions (ISRs), including infection, bleeding, pain and tenderness, nodules, swelling, and induration, have occurred with SUSTOL. Monitor for ISRs following SUSTOL injection. Inform patients that some ISRs may occur 2 weeks or more after SUSTOL administration. In patients receiving antiplatelet agents or anticoagulants, consider the increased risk of bruising or severe hematoma prior to the use of SUSTOL.

Monitor for constipation and decreased bowel activity and consider optimizing patients’ current bowel regimens used for managing preexisting constipation. Instruct patients to seek immediate medical care if signs and symptoms of ileus occur.

Hypersensitivity reactions have been reported and may occur up to 7 days or longer following SUSTOL administration and may have an extended course. If a reaction occurs, administer appropriate treatment and monitor until signs and symptoms resolve.

Serotonin syndrome has been reported with 5-HT3 receptor antagonists alone but particularly with concomitant use of serotonergic drugs.

Use in Specific Populations

Avoid SUSTOL in patients with severe renal impairment. In patients with moderate renal impairment, administer SUSTOL not more frequently than once every 14 days.

Adverse Reactions

Most common adverse reactions (≥3%) are injection site reactions, constipation, fatigue, headache, diarrhea, abdominal pain, insomnia, dyspepsia, dizziness, asthenia, and gastroesophageal reflux.

For more information about SUSTOL, please see full Prescribing Information.

Reference:
  1. Navari RM. Management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Drugs. 2013;3:249-262.




Indication

SUSTOL is indicated in combination with other antiemetics in adults for the prevention of acute and delayed nausea and vomiting associated with initial and repeat courses of moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC) or anthracycline and cyclophosphamide (AC) combination chemotherapy regimens.

Important Safety Information

Contraindications

SUSTOL is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to granisetron, any of the components of SUSTOL, or any other 5-HT3 receptor antagonist.

Warnings and Precautions

Injection site reactions (ISRs), including infection, bleeding, pain and tenderness, nodules, swelling, and induration, have occurred with SUSTOL. Monitor for ISRs following SUSTOL injection. Inform patients that some ISRs may occur 2 weeks or more after SUSTOL administration. In patients receiving antiplatelet agents or anticoagulants, consider the increased risk of bruising or severe hematoma prior to the use of SUSTOL.

Monitor for constipation and decreased bowel activity and consider optimizing patients’ current bowel regimens used for managing preexisting constipation. Instruct patients to seek immediate medical care if signs and symptoms of ileus occur.

Hypersensitivity reactions have been reported and may occur up to 7 days or longer following SUSTOL administration and may have an extended course. If a reaction occurs, administer appropriate treatment and monitor until signs and symptoms resolve.

Serotonin syndrome has been reported with 5-HT3 receptor antagonists alone but particularly with concomitant use of serotonergic drugs.

Use in Specific Populations

Avoid SUSTOL in patients with severe renal impairment. In patients with moderate renal impairment, administer SUSTOL not more frequently than once every 14 days.

Adverse Reactions

Most common adverse reactions (≥3%) are injection site reactions, constipation, fatigue, headache, diarrhea, abdominal pain, insomnia, dyspepsia, dizziness, asthenia, and gastroesophageal reflux.

For more information about SUSTOL, please see full Prescribing Information.