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Common Questions You May Have About SUSTOL

You’re bound to have questions when learning about a new treatment. Speaking with your healthcare provider is the best way to get all of the information you need. In the meantime, here are some answers to questions that you may have about SUSTOL.
Why did my healthcare provider prescribe SUSTOL?
Up to 80% of patients may experience chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting after receiving treatment.1 That is why you were prescribed SUSTOL.
What is SUSTOL?
SUSTOL is a prescription medicine called an “antiemetic.” SUSTOL is used in adults to help prevent the nausea and vomiting that happens right away or later with certain anti-cancer medicines (chemotherapy). It is different from other antiemetics. After being injected under the skin, it slowly releases medication to prevent nausea and vomiting.2,3
How does SUSTOL help?
SUSTOL is different from other antiemetics in that it is designed to be injected under the skin to slowly release medication over time. This design is why SUSTOL can help protect you for up to 5 days.3
When will I get SUSTOL?
Your healthcare professional will inject SUSTOL about 30 minutes before you receive your anti-cancer medicine (chemotherapy).2
What side effects can I expect with SUSTOL?
  • The most common side effects of SUSTOL include: injection site reactions, constipation, fatigue, headache, diarrhea, stomach-area (abdominal) pain, trouble sleeping or falling asleep, indigestion, dizziness, weakness, and heartburn2
  • These are not all the possible side effects of SUSTOL. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or does not go away
Is SUSTOL expensive?
SUSTOL is covered under most insurance plans for patients who qualify. If you have commercial insurance, you may be eligible for a $0 copay,* and SUSTOL may also be provided at no cost to eligible patients who need financial assistance. For more information, call SUSTOL Connect™ Patient Services at 1-855-SUSTOL-6 (1-855-787-8656).
What if I have more questions about SUSTOL?
If you have other questions about SUSTOL, ask your healthcare professional or call SUSTOL Connect™ Patient Services at 1-855-SUSTOL-6 (1-855-787-8656).
*Limitations apply. Offer not valid as follows: (a) patients covered under Medicare, Medicaid, or any federal or state program; (b) where plan covers treatment for the patient for the entire cost of the prescription drug; or (c) towards the patient's deductible. Patients pay $0 copay per dose per 12-month calendar period. For cash-paying patients, the program will cover $150 per prescription up to $1,800 per calendar year. Eligibility is for 12 months, after which patient will need to reapply for continued assistance. Please see sustol.com for full terms and conditions. This offer expires 12-31-17.
Heron Therapeutics reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to discontinue the Patient Assistance Program or change the qualifications at any time. All patient information remains confidential. Product supply for the program depends upon availability.

Approved Use

SUSTOL is a prescription medicine called an “antiemetic.” SUSTOL is used in adults to help prevent the nausea and vomiting that happens right away or later with certain anti-cancer medicines (chemotherapy).

Important Safety Information

Do not receive SUSTOL if you are allergic to granisetron, any of the ingredients in SUSTOL, or any other medicine of this type (5-HT3s) used to help prevent nausea and vomiting.

Injection site reactions may be serious and require medical care. Reactions include infections, bruising, swelling that is caused by blood that collects under the skin (hematoma), bleeding, pain, tenderness, and small bumps (nodules) at the injection site. Some reactions may occur 2 weeks or more after SUSTOL administration. Your risk of severe bruising and hematomas at the injection site is increased if you take a blood thinner medicine (anticoagulant or antiplatelet medicine). Get medical care right away if you have signs of an infection at the injection site or bleeding at the injection site that is severe or lasting more than 24 hours.

Stomach and intestinal problems, such as problems with bowel movement (constipation), may be serious. Tell your healthcare provider if you have constipation or your constipation worsens after you receive SUSTOL. Get medical care right away if you have pain or swelling in your stomach area (abdomen).

Serious allergic reactions have happened in people who received SUSTOL and who have had allergic reactions to other 5-HT3 medicines. These reactions may occur up to 7 days or longer following SUSTOL administration. Get emergency medical help right away if you have any signs or symptoms of a serious allergic reaction including hives, swollen face, breathing trouble, or chest pain.

Serotonin syndrome is a possible life-threatening problem that can happen when taking 5-HT3 medicines, especially when used with some medicines that treat depression and migraine headaches.

Before receiving SUSTOL, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including constipation, recent stomach-area (abdominal) surgery, kidney problems and about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Inform your doctor if you are pregnant or breastfeeding or plan to become pregnant or breastfeed.

The most common side effects of SUSTOL include: injection site reactions, constipation, fatigue, headache, diarrhea, stomach-area (abdominal) pain, trouble sleeping or falling asleep, indigestion, dizziness, weakness, and heartburn.

For more information about SUSTOL, talk to your doctor or see full Prescribing Information.

References:
  1. National Cancer Institute. Nausea and vomiting—for health professionals (PDR®). www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/side-effects/nausea/nausea-hp-pdq. Accessed February 28, 2016.
  2. SUSTOL [package insert]. Heron Therapeutics, Inc., Redwood City, CA; August 2016.
  3. Ottoboni T, Gelder MS, O’Boyle E. Biochronomer™ technology and the development of APF530, a sustained release formulation of granisetron. J Exp Pharmacol. 2014;6:15-21.




Approved Use

SUSTOL is a prescription medicine called an “antiemetic.” SUSTOL is used in adults to help prevent the nausea and vomiting that happens right away or later with certain anti-cancer medicines (chemotherapy).

Important Safety Information

Do not receive SUSTOL if you are allergic to granisetron, any of the ingredients in SUSTOL, or any other medicine of this type (5-HT3s) used to help prevent nausea and vomiting.

Injection site reactions may be serious and require medical care. Reactions include infections, bruising, swelling that is caused by blood that collects under the skin (hematoma), bleeding, pain, tenderness, and small bumps (nodules) at the injection site. Some reactions may occur 2 weeks or more after SUSTOL administration. Your risk of severe bruising and hematomas at the injection site is increased if you take a blood thinner medicine (anticoagulant or antiplatelet medicine). Get medical care right away if you have signs of an infection at the injection site or bleeding at the injection site that is severe or lasting more than 24 hours.

Stomach and intestinal problems, such as problems with bowel movement (constipation), may be serious. Tell your healthcare provider if you have constipation or your constipation worsens after you receive SUSTOL. Get medical care right away if you have pain or swelling in your stomach area (abdomen).

Serious allergic reactions have happened in people who received SUSTOL and who have had allergic reactions to other 5-HT3 medicines. These reactions may occur up to 7 days or longer following SUSTOL administration. Get emergency medical help right away if you have any signs or symptoms of a serious allergic reaction including hives, swollen face, breathing trouble, or chest pain.

Serotonin syndrome is a possible life-threatening problem that can happen when taking 5-HT3 medicines, especially when used with some medicines that treat depression and migraine headaches.

Before receiving SUSTOL, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including constipation, recent stomach-area (abdominal) surgery, kidney problems and about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Inform your doctor if you are pregnant or breastfeeding or plan to become pregnant or breastfeed.

The most common side effects of SUSTOL include: injection site reactions, constipation, fatigue, headache, diarrhea, stomach-area (abdominal) pain, trouble sleeping or falling asleep, indigestion, dizziness, weakness, and heartburn.